Chapul Blog: nutrition, recipes, and and current events for the Chapul adventurer — nutrition


Iron: essential to healthy brain function

In 2001 U.S. researchers studied a group of 5398 children who were attending school, searching for possible links between academic success and nutrition. Although important micronutrients such as Vitamin B12 are often implicated in these kinds of studies, The results of a 2001 study on a group 5,000 US elementary school students were somewhat alarming: lower math scores correlated strongly with iron deficiency (IDA). In fact, researchers calculated that children with an iron deficiency “had greater than twice the risk of scoring below average in math than did children with normal iron status.” Although  Appreciating the impact of iron levels on cognition and other biological processes is important because IDA is the most common nutritional deficiency in the U.S. Aside...

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Potential solution to depression, dementia, and multiple sclerosis - Vitamin B12

 Vitamin B12-deficiency is linked to the depression, dementia, and unhealthy aging. Dietary sources remain the gold standard, but pay attention to the finer details. Absorption and bioavailability matter.    According to the Anxiety and Depression Association, depression is “the leading cause of disability in the U.S. for ages 15 to 44,” affecting about 6.7% of the U.S. population. When thinking more generally about neurological disorders, the figure is much higher. In Europe it’s estimated that “neuropsychiatric diseases make up approximately 35% of the total burden of disease in Europe.“ [1] Neurologists are discovering that, despite their very different origins, many of these diseases involve improperly functioning metabolic pathways, largely due to poor nutrition. Within this context, one of the...

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Does Cricket Flour contain the fountain of youth?

As scientists learn more about ageing and longevity in humans, they're focusing on compounds that signal the body to clear damaged parts of the cell. It's been discovered that one such key compound is spermidine, which is found in crickets. Healthy autophagy means longer living When researching longevity in humans, scientists tend to focus on a biological pathway known as autophagy. Basically, autophagy is a form of biological recycling in which cells clear unhealthy, damaged material. Here’s an official definition:    Autophagy is a self-degradative process that is important for balancing sources of energy at critical times in development and in response to nutrient stress. Autophagy also plays a housekeeping role in removing misfolded or aggregated proteins, clearing damaged organelles, such as...

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International Society of Sports Nutrition's Recent Study = Incomplete

  Less than a month ago, the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) updated its “objective and critical” suggestion for how much protein is necessary to build and maintain muscle. They recommended 1.4-2.0 g protein/kg body weight/day (g/kg/d). Depending on your level of training, demands may be even higher. To fuel these demands, ISSN observes that whole foods help ensure a firm foundation, but in many cases supplementation plays a key role, packaging high quality amino acids in a low caloric profile. The remainder of their recommendations focus on the role of protein in athletic and resistance training. When providing evidence, the authors point to case studies involving whey protein isolates taken before and after workouts, as compared with casein...

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What Happens When Consumers See “cricket flour” On A Label?

Cricket Flour on a Label? The Outcome Is Not What You Would Expect: What happens when Western food marketers blend novel food items, such as insect protein, with more commonly accepted ingredients? A recent study suggests that may be an effective strategy. Researchers from the Division of Human Nutrition at the Wageningen University in The Netherlands recently investigated the extent to which consuming novel food ingredients, such as insects, is shaped by beliefs held by a consumer before they ever eat the actual product. What they found has implications for marketers and producers of novel food products in Western countries. Hui Shan Grace Tan, Claudia Joyce Tibboel, and Markus Stieger jointly published the study, “Why do unusual novel foods like...

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