Chapul Blog: nutrition, recipes, and and current events for the Chapul adventurer — novel food


Eating Crickets in Moab

Eating insects is easy: start with crickets! Entomophagy: the practice of eating insects Utah was put on the map when our founder Pat Crowley pitched edible cricket flour as an alternative protein source. This disrupted previously well-defined relationships in the food industry. Eklecticafe in Moab quickly became one of our top supporters. Meandering through Utah's vast variety of landscapes often leads to the town of Moab. Known for its hot desert landscape, unparalleled sunsets, sandstone arches, and expansive towers, it brings a heavy flow of tourist traffic.   Open only for breakfast and lunch, Eklectic is the hot spot for an early bite before hitting the trails. Don't let the line out the door deter you. The turnaround time is astonishingly fast and there is...

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What Happens When Consumers See “cricket flour” On A Label?

Cricket Flour on a Label? The Outcome Is Not What You Would Expect: What happens when Western food marketers blend novel food items, such as insect protein, with more commonly accepted ingredients? A recent study suggests that may be an effective strategy. Researchers from the Division of Human Nutrition at the Wageningen University in The Netherlands recently investigated the extent to which consuming novel food ingredients, such as insects, is shaped by beliefs held by a consumer before they ever eat the actual product. What they found has implications for marketers and producers of novel food products in Western countries. Hui Shan Grace Tan, Claudia Joyce Tibboel, and Markus Stieger jointly published the study, “Why do unusual novel foods like...

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What happens when consumers see “cricket flour” on a label? The outcome is not what you would expect.

What happens when Western food marketers blend novel food items, such as insect protein, with more commonly accepted ingredients? A recent study suggests that may be an effective strategy.   Researchers from the Division of Human Nutrition at the Wageningen University in The Netherlands recently investigated the extent to which consuming novel food ingredients, such as insects, is shaped by beliefs held by a consumer before they ever eat the actual product. What they found has implications for marketers and producers of novel food products in Western countries. Hui Shan Grace Tan, Claudia Joyce Tibboel, and Markus Stieger jointly published the study, “Why do unusual novel foods like insects lack sensory appeal? Investigating the underlying sensory perceptions”. Their experiment involved...

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